ECR 2018 TOPIC PACKAGE

Head and neck

  • 16 LECTURES
  • 399 MINUTES
  • 13 SPEAKERS
  • ESR MEMBERS €9
  • NON-MEMBERS €19

Learning Objectives

A. Temporal bone and skull base

(A. Trojanowska)
 
  1. To differentiate the anatomy, normal variants and congenital disorders of the temporal bone.
  2. To understand the causes and imaging features of hearing and vestibular disorders.
  3. To describe the imaging presentation of the most common tumours of the skull base. .
 

B. Nose, paranasal sinuses and nasopharynx

(C. Czerny)
 
  1. To describe the anatomy and normal variants of the nose, paranasal sinuses and nasopharynx.
  2. To differentiate the imaging features of acute and chronic inflammatory changes of the nose and paranasal sinuses.
  3. To understand the imaging features of benign and malignant tumours of the nose, paranasal sinuses and nasopharynx.
 

C. Oral cavity, oro- and hypopharynx and larynx

(M. Becker)
 
  1. To describe the normal imaging anatomy of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx and larynx.
  2. To understand the imaging features of tumours of the oral cavity and oropharynx.
  3. To describe the imaging features of tumours of the hypopharynx.
  4. To understand the imaging features of tumours of the larynx.
 

Sinuses

(R. Maroldi)
 
  1. To discuss current imaging techniques for evaluation of normal anatomy.
  2. To describe common imaging manifestations of inflammatory diseases.
  3. To review tumour and tumour-like lesions.
 

Thyroid and parathyroid

(H. Imhof)
 
  1. To discuss current imaging techniques for evaluation of normal anatomy.
  2. To describe common imaging manifestations of inflammatory diseases.
  3. To identify and describe the imaging appearance of malignant pathologies.
 

Salivary glands

(S. J. Golding)
 
  1. To discuss current imaging techniques for evaluation of normal anatomy.
  2. To describe common imaging manifestations of inflammatory diseases.
  3. To identify and describe the imaging appearance of malignant pathologies.
 

Lymph nodes

(S. S. Özbek)
 
  1. To discuss current imaging techniques for evaluation of normal anatomy.
  2. To describe the imaging features of infectious and inflammatory disorders.
  3. To describe the imaging appearance of neoplastic disorders.
 

A. Anatomical variants without clinical consequence

(F. A. Pameijer)
 
  1. To gain insight into the great variability of head and neck anatomy.
  2. To be able to recognise pseudo lesions.
 

B. Anatomical variants posing surgical risks

(D. Farina)
 
  1. To learn about structures at risk during functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS).
  2. To become familiar with vascular variants in the head and neck.
  3. To appreciate surgical anatomical landmarks in the head and neck.
 

C. Distinct head and neck disease or systemic disease?

(M. G. Mack)
 
  1. To recognise head and neck manifestations of systemic disease.
  2. To categorise lesions into different pathologic entities.
 

A. Differential diagnoses of orbital masses

(V. Chong)
 
  1. To become familiar with the anatomy of the orbit.
  2. To learn which imaging technique to use.
  3. To understand the typical imaging appearance of orbital masses.
 

B. Differential diagnoses of the jaw masses

(C. Czerny)
 
  1. To become familiar with the anatomy of the jaw.
  2. To learn which imaging technique to use.
  3. To understand the typical imaging appearance of jaw lesions.
 

C. Differential diagnoses of soft tissue masses

(D. Farina)
 
  1. To become familiar with the anatomy.
  2. To learn which imaging technique to use.
  3. To understand the typical imaging appearance of soft tissue masses.
 

What is broken?

(E. Loney)
 
  1. To know which imaging techniques to use in case of trauma.
  2. To become familiar with base of skull fracture (including temporal bone and orbit).
  3. To learn about maxillofacial fractures.
  4. To get acquainted with the traumatic lesions of the larynx.
 

It is red and swollen...

(M. Becker)
 
  1. To learn which imaging techniques to use in the case of an infection and inflammation in the emergency setting.
  2. To become familiar with the infections of the base of skull.
  3. To understand the diversity of infection patterns of soft tissues.
  4. To appreciate the pathologies of the salivary glands that may present in the emergency setting.
 

It is bleeding . . .

(D.-A. Varoquaux)
 
  1. To learn about the vascular blunt and penetrating traumatic injuries.
  2. To appreciate the role of the interventional radiologist in the treatment of epistaxis and tumours (juvenile angiofibroma and squamous cell carcinoma) in the emergency setting.
  3. To have notions of vascular malformations and their complications.
  4. To acquire basic notions of endovascular treatments.