ECR 2018 TOPIC PACKAGE

Imaging of the hip and lower extremities

  • 8 LECTURES
  • 207 MINUTES
  • 7 SPEAKERS
  • ESR MEMBERS €9
  • NON-MEMBERS €19

Learning Objectives

A. Femoroacetabular impingement: what is it, how do I image it and does it matter?

(R. Sutter)
 
  1. To understand the mechanism of femoroacetabular impingement.
  2. To learn about the imaging findings in patients with femoroacetabular impingement.
 

B. Groin pain in the athlete: what causes it and what does imaging contribute?

(P. Robinson)
 
  1. To understand the anatomy of the groin region.
  2. To learn about the imaging findings in athletes with groin pain.
 

C. Muscle injury of the hip and thigh

(M.-A. Weber)
 
  1. To understand the imaging patterns of muscle injury at the hip and thigh.
  2. To learn about grading and prognostic values of muscle injuries.
 

Hip

(A. H. Karantanas)
 
  1. To identify intra- and extra-articular anatomy on MRI.
  2. To learn what we see and what we miss on radiographs.
  3. To understand osteoarthritis and learn its key features on imaging.
 

Knee

(M. Klontzas)
 
  1. To identify intra- and extra-articular anatomy on MRI.
  2. To learn what we see and what we miss on radiographs.
  3. To understand and learn the key features of meniscal injury.
 

Ankle

(F. Smithuis)
 
  1. To identify intra- and extra-articular anatomy on MRI.
  2. To learn what we see and what we miss on radiographs.
  3. To understand and learn key features of ankle sprain..
 

A. Hip and pubic symphysis

(S. J. Eustace)
 
  1. To identify the most common post-traumatic entities.
  2. To identify the most common entities leading to chronic pain.
  3. To know the role of MR imaging and MR arthrography (direct/indirect) and how to optimise imaging protocols for the hip.
 

B. Post-traumatic ankle

(M.-A. Weber)
 
  1. To identify the most common post-traumatic entities.
  2. To know the role of MR imaging and MR arthrography (direct/indirect) and how to optimise imaging protocols for the ankle.
  3. To differentiate post-traumatic changes from typical reasons for chronic pain.