Research Presentation Session

Radiographer role and professional challenges

NOT AVAILABLE

Lectures

1
RPS 1014a - Occupational burnout among radiographers: findings from a national survey

RPS 1014a - Occupational burnout among radiographers: findings from a national survey

04:27L. Ribeiro, Parchal / PT

Purpose:

Burnout is a complex phenomenon characterised by emotional exhaustion, social detachment, and feelings of low personal achievement. In this study, we aim to establish the prevalence of burnout among radiographers and to explore the factors influencing its development.

Methods and materials:

A total of 205 radiographers from the country answered the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), composed of 3 dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and personal achievement associated with a sociodemographic and professional characterisation questionnaire. The questionnaire was made available online and confidentiality was assured to all participants.

Results:

The global internal consistency of MBI accessed by the Cronbach’s alpha was 0.776. Statistically significant differences were observed between rotational shift work and depersonalisation (t=2.482; p=0.014) and personal achievement (t=2.352; p=0.020). Using the one-way ANOVA, significant differences were observed between professional experience and professional satisfaction and the three MBI dimensions. The average burnout value was 22.9 (three levels, where the middle level ranges from 34-66). Regarding the burnout dimensions, emotional exhaustion was positioned in the middle level (out of three levels), while depersonalisation and personal achievement scored the highest level.

Conclusion:

Radiographers in this research suffer from burnout syndrome. Rotational shiftwork is the major cause of depersonalisation and reduces the sense of personal achievement. Professional satisfaction is negatively affected by this syndrome. High emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, and the low sense of personal achievement, are also common among professionals that work for more years. The health promotion for healthcare professionals should be addressed by healthcare facilities across the country.

Limitations:

n/a

Ethics committee approval

The ethics committee approved the study and written informed consent was obtained.

Funding:

No funding was received for this work.

2
RPS 1014a - The radiographer's role in Italy: a national survey on the development and growth of radiographers’ skills

RPS 1014a - The radiographer's role in Italy: a national survey on the development and growth of radiographers’ skills

05:21M. Giusti, Arezzo / IT

Purpose:

A complete overview of the radiographers’ professional profile plays a fundamental role in the assessment of possible development and growth of radiographers’ skills. The aim of this study was to assess the Italian radiographers' profile.

Methods and materials:

The Italian Federation of Scientific Radiographers Societies (FASTeR) proposed a national online survey, including 64 questions and sub-divided into different topics. Italian radiographers count around 28,000 individuals.

Results:

We obtained 872 (3.1%) answers, 480 (55%) males, 392 (45%) radiographers had been working for less than 10 years, 610 (70%) had a bachelor degree, and 358 (41%) were highly specialised with a master degree (European qualification framework level 7). A total of 602 (69%) radiographers worked mostly as an employee in the public health sector, 637 (73%) in hospitals, and 732 (84%) full-time, earning in 40% of cases between 22,001-28,000€ gross per year. Radiographers have a good knowledge of the institutional/hospital organisation chart (663, 76%) and management (knowledge of the budget) of the employment institution. Radiographers duties included the optimisation and control (680, 78%) of the technological equipment. Selected future areas of professional growth were the technological sector with new technologies development (576, 66%), as well as healthcare professions management (567, 65%).

Conclusion:

When analysing the actual role and skills of Italian radiographers, it is evident that the professional responsibility will increase through scientific research, management of new technologies, and department governance in the next years.

Limitations:

An Italian survey.

Ethics committee approval

n/a

Funding:

This study was supported and promoted by the Italian National Radiographers Federation and Technical, Rehabilitation and Prevention Health Professions (FNO TSRM PSTRP).

3
RPS 1014a - Patterns of movement of radiographers and professional qualifications recognition across the European Union

RPS 1014a - Patterns of movement of radiographers and professional qualifications recognition across the European Union

06:15J. Couto, Msida / MT

Purpose:

The 2005/36/EC directive established the process for the recognition of academic qualifications between EU member states, facilitating the movement of radiographers. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of movement of radiographers across the EU.

Methods and materials:

A review of the Regulated Professions Database (RPD) was performed for 2015-2017. Data extracted included the number of radiographers applying for recognition of qualification that achieved recognition, required compensation measures (exam or adaptation period) before recognition, or were denied recognition. The direction of professional movement across countries was also investigated.

Results:

510 radiographers achieved recognition in another EU country each year. The UK, Ireland, and Germany are the countries receiving the most radiographers annually (203, 96, and 42, respectively). Most radiographers move away from Italy, Portugal, and the UK (108, 90, and 89, respectively).

France, Italy, and Finland required a higher proportion of applicants to undergo compensation measures (94%, 83%, and 80%, respectively). The countries of origin with a higher proportion of radiographers undergoing compensation measures were Estonia, Belgium, and Bulgaria (86%, 61%, and 50%, respectively).

The applicants with the highest proportion of rejected recognitions come from Romania (14%), Germany (13%), and the Czech Republic (11%).

Conclusion:

Radiographers move between all EU member states. Two patterns of movement were identified: south to north, possibly due to higher wages, and between neighbouring countries, possibly as language was not a barrier. Negative replies and compensation measures seem to be caused by differences in training or lack of regulation of the profession.

Limitations:

Data was not available for 21% of the EU countries. Some of the radiographers that achieved recognition may not move.

Ethics committee approval

n/a

Funding:

PhD funded by the University of Malta.

4
RPS 1014a - Awareness of Medical Radiation Exposure among Patients

RPS 1014a - Awareness of Medical Radiation Exposure among Patients

04:15L. Ribeiro

5
RPS 1014a - Compassionate patient care in diagnostic medical imaging

RPS 1014a - Compassionate patient care in diagnostic medical imaging

06:45K. Knapp, Exeter / UK

Purpose:

Compassion is a poorly understood concept in medical imaging research, but an increase in its focus was recommended in the Francis report (2013). This study aimed to conceptualise compassion in diagnostic imaging.

Methods and materials:

The project was conducted from within a constructivist paradigm. 34 semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of DI ex-patients. 5 focus groups with approximately 6 student radiographers and 1 group of post-graduate radiographers were facilitated. Data was harvested from a Twitter journal club discussion between radiographers of the author’s published literature review. Data was transcribed and analysed thematically.

Results:

Compassion in DI is conceptualised according to three themes constructed from the data: 1) perceptible elements of the procedure, 2) underlying qualities, skills, and abilities of radiographers, and 3) moral and ethical foundations. Perceptions of an impersonal ‘production line’ technical procedure can be avoided and rapport developed by developing skills and abilities in asking targeted clinical questions and explanations, particularly during the introductory stage. Offering information about patients’ x-ray images during the closing stages may compassionately reduce uncertainty and anxiety. Ethical practice need not necessarily include in every interaction expressions of compassion, feelings in a radiographer of caring about their patient, or feelings in patients of being valued. Contradictory organisational values were revealed in the data with an over-emphasis on an individuals responsibility for providing compassionate care.

Conclusion:

The concept of compassion has depth, with surface appearances underpinned by moral values and behaviour-motivating drivers. The findings have implications for the scope of practice around training and competence in image interpretation and could inform future interventions to re-structure the communication and interpersonal components of patient examinations in DI.

Limitations:

Maintaining focus in interviews.

Ethics committee approval

UoE approval granted.

Funding:

No funding was received for this work.

6
RPS 1014a - The EFRS Research Hub: promoting research in radiography

RPS 1014a - The EFRS Research Hub: promoting research in radiography

05:45L. Rainford, Dublin / IE

Purpose:

The importance of radiographer involvement in research, and research in radiographer practice, has long been recognised, although there continues to be calls for further development of a research culture in the profession. Imaging research often requires access to large numbers of radiographers or other professional participants, which can be very difficult, time-intensive and expensive to achieve.

The European Federation of Radiographer Societies (EFRS) in 2019 launched the inaugural EFRS Research Hub 2019 at the European Congress of Radiology, Vienna. The Hub aims to provide radiographers and allied researchers with opportunities to conduct and take part in high-quality research, thereby raising research awareness and involvement, and expanding the professional evidence base. The development of the Hub and a summary of research outcomes to date will be provided.

Methods and materials:

A venue adjacent to the Radiographers’ Lounge at ECR 2019 was secured and arranged at the congress venue. 7 research projects, catering to a spectrum of radiographer participants, were devised by researchers across 3 institutions. These included projects supported the work of 2 radiographer PhD researchers. Specialist software and equipment were supplied through in-kind vendor support.

Results:

The Hub 2019 attracted 249 radiographer/radiography student participants hailing from over 30 countries. These participants participated 437 times over the 7 studies. The success of the Hub is a testament to the enthusiasm of radiographers. The EFRS approved the continuation and expansion of the Hub for ECR 2020.

Conclusion:

The EFRS Research Hub offers a valuable opportunity for imaging researchers, promoting a research culture in radiography. The diversity of research undertaken at ECR2020 will expand and an activity review will be disseminated.

Limitations:

n/a

Ethics committee approval

n/a

Funding:

Partial funding: EFRS for the Research Hub.

7
RPS 1014a - Ethical evidence in radiology research

RPS 1014a - Ethical evidence in radiology research

06:03Ana Quadrado, Coimbra / PT

Purpose:

As scientific research papers produce vital benefits for society, it is of utmost importance that researchers respect ethical parameters. Thus, the distribution of the response pattern of each project to the ethical precepts, previously defined as fundamental in a scientific investigation, should be evaluated.

Methods and materials:

An original observational studies checklist was produced and validated to be fulfilled with the main ethical aspects of each research paper. The study sample comprised all research projects developed in the medical imaging and radiotherapy course, in 50 research projects in the areas of radiology, radiotherapy, and nuclear medicine, in Coimbra Health School. Descriptive analysis, using qualitative nominal variables and consisting of an exploration of absolute and relative frequencies, was implemented. Data collection was accomplished in a retrospective, observational, descriptive, and exploratory manner.

Results:

The majority of papers didn't reveal ethical concerns. Only about 1/3 of scientific research revealed compliance with ethical aspects. As a positive standard of compliance, there was evidence of beneficence, non-maleficence, non-discrimination, respect for anonymity, and proportionality principle. As a negative pattern of compliance, there was no proof of respect for autonomy and individual responsibility, free, informed, express and written consent, no stigmatisation, and neither respect for privacy nor respect for confidentiality.

Conclusion:

Unfortunately, this research exposes the predomination of a lack of ethical indications produced by researchers investigations, revealing ethical culture failure.

It also shows the Institutional Research Ethics Committees and the National Data Protection Commission's flaw in allowing the publication of scientific papers without ethical evidence and orientation.

Without doubt, the Institutional Review Committees should undertake the review of such investigations to safeguard the rights and well-being of stakeholders.

Limitations:

A large sample size.

Ethics committee approval

n/a

Funding:

No funding was received for this work.

8
RPS 1014a - Postgraduate education in radiography: what is the bigger picture?

RPS 1014a - Postgraduate education in radiography: what is the bigger picture?

07:08J. Grehan, Dublin / IE

Purpose:

The roles of allied health professionals are changing constantly and radiographers today find themselves working in one of the fastest evolving professions in healthcare. In a technology-led environment, postgraduate education alongside continuing professional development (CPD) is fundamental to ensuring competency and high standards within diagnostic imaging. Following a European-wide EFRS radiography education survey, McNulty et al (2015) raised concerns as a lack of postgraduate radiography offerings were identified. This study was conducted to gain a snapshot of the landscape of radiography postgraduate education across Europe and internationally.

Methods and materials:

A single page questionnaire totalling 13 closed questions was developed, comprising 4 topic areas: demographics, working practices, postgraduate education, and funding. This was administered over 4 days to radiographers as part of the EFRS Radiographers Research Hub at the European Congress for Radiology conference 2019. 100 responses were received.

Results:

Participants from 27 countries completed questionnaires. The mean number of years qualified was 14 across a range of grades. 67% of participants had postgraduate qualifications with 45% stating they used their postgraduate education daily. 55% of countries stated having senior grade radiographers in charge of modalities, while only 20% required that these senior posts have postgraduate qualifications. 37% of countries reported no formal postgraduate offerings in the modalities of CT/MR/NM/US/IR. There was no standardisation of postgraduate funding with the majority of self-funding (36%).

Conclusion:

This study identified a lack of standardisation across funding, representation in radiography departments, and availability. A positive perception towards postgraduate education was noted, however, barriers identified require strategic consideration.

Limitations:

Participants were professionally active and attending ECR 2019. The data represents this subset of radiographers and further research is warranted outside of a conference setting.

Ethics committee approval

n/a

Funding:

No funding was received for this work.